MariaDB

Installation

apk add mariadb mariadb-common mariadb-client

Initialisation

Il faut lancer la commande pour initialiser le service et créer la base SQL de départ.

alpine:~# rc-service mariadb setup
 * Creating a new MySQL database ...
Installing MariaDB/MySQL system tables in '/var/lib/mysql' ...
OK

To start mysqld at boot time you have to copy
support-files/mysql.server to the right place for your system


Two all-privilege accounts were created.
One is [email protected], it has no password, but you need to
be system 'root' user to connect. Use, for example, sudo mysql
The second is [email protected], it has no password either, but
you need to be the system 'mysql' user to connect.
After connecting you can set the password, if you would need to be
able to connect as any of these users with a password and without sudo

See the MariaDB Knowledgebase at http://mariadb.com/kb or the
MySQL manual for more instructions.

You can start the MariaDB daemon with:
cd '/usr' ; /usr/bin/mysqld_safe --datadir='/var/lib/mysql'

You can test the MariaDB daemon with mysql-test-run.pl
cd '/usr/mysql-test' ; perl mysql-test-run.pl

Please report any problems at http://mariadb.org/jira

The latest information about MariaDB is available at http://mariadb.org/.
You can find additional information about the MySQL part at:
http://dev.mysql.com
Consider joining MariaDB's strong and vibrant community:
https://mariadb.org/get-involved/
                                                                                        [ ok ]

Inscription du service au boot

alpine:~# rc-update add mariadb default
 * service mariadb added to runlevel default

Lancement du service

alpine:~# rc-service mariadb start
 * Starting mariadb ...
200606 17:17:43 mysqld_safe Logging to syslog.
200606 17:17:43 mysqld_safe Starting mysqld daemon with databases from /var/lib/mysql                                             [ ok ]

Configuration

Il y a une petite subtilité, c'est mariadb-secure-installation même si mysql_secure_instalation est toujours présent.

alpine:~# mariadb-secure-installation

NOTE: RUNNING ALL PARTS OF THIS SCRIPT IS RECOMMENDED FOR ALL MariaDB
      SERVERS IN PRODUCTION USE!  PLEASE READ EACH STEP CAREFULLY!

In order to log into MariaDB to secure it, we'll need the current
password for the root user. If you've just installed MariaDB, and
haven't set the root password yet, you should just press enter here.

Enter current password for root (enter for none):
OK, successfully used password, moving on...

Setting the root password or using the unix_socket ensures that nobody
can log into the MariaDB root user without the proper authorisation.

You already have your root account protected, so you can safely answer 'n'.

Switch to unix_socket authentication [Y/n] y
Enabled successfully!
Reloading privilege tables..
 ... Success!


You already have your root account protected, so you can safely answer 'n'.

Change the root password? [Y/n] y
New password:
Re-enter new password:
Password updated successfully!
Reloading privilege tables..
 ... Success!


By default, a MariaDB installation has an anonymous user, allowing anyone
to log into MariaDB without having to have a user account created for
them.  This is intended only for testing, and to make the installation
go a bit smoother.  You should remove them before moving into a
production environment.

Remove anonymous users? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

Normally, root should only be allowed to connect from 'localhost'.  This
ensures that someone cannot guess at the root password from the network.

Disallow root login remotely? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

By default, MariaDB comes with a database named 'test' that anyone can
access.  This is also intended only for testing, and should be removed
before moving into a production environment.

Remove test database and access to it? [Y/n] y
 - Dropping test database...
 ... Success!
 - Removing privileges on test database...
 ... Success!

Reloading the privilege tables will ensure that all changes made so far
will take effect immediately.

Reload privilege tables now? [Y/n] y
 ... Success!

Cleaning up...

All done!  If you've completed all of the above steps, your MariaDB
installation should now be secure.

Thanks for using MariaDB!